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  • Predictors of Patient-Reported Pain and Functional Outcomes Over 10 Years After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    18 September 2018

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed at identifying preoperative predictors of patient-reported outcomes after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and at investigating their association with the outcomes over time. METHODS: We used data from 2080 patients from the Knee Arthroplasty Trial who received primary TKA in the United Kingdom between July 1999 and January 2003. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford knee score (OKS) collected annually over 10 years after TKA. Preoperative predictors included a range of patient characteristics and clinical conditions. Mixed-effects linear regression model analysis of repeated measurements was used to identify predictors of overall OKS, and pain and function subscale scores over 10 years, separately. RESULTS: Worse preoperative OKS, worse mental well-being, body mass index greater than 35 kg/m2, living in the most deprived areas, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists grade, presence of comorbidities, and history of previous knee surgery were associated with worse overall OKS over 10 years after surgery. The same predictors were identified for pain and function subscale scores, and for both long-term (10 years) and short-to-medium-term outcomes (1 and 5 years). However, fitted models explained more variations in function and shorter-term outcomes than in pain and longer-term outcomes, respectively. CONCLUSION: The same predictors were identified for pain and functional outcomes over both short-to-medium term and long term after TKA. Within the factors identified, functional and shorter-term outcomes were more predictable than pain and longer-term outcomes, respectively. Regardless of their preoperative characteristics, on average, patients achieved substantial improvement in pain over time, although improvement for function was less prominent.

  • Site-Dependent Reference Point Microindentation Complements Clinical Measures for Improved Fracture Risk Assessment at the Human Femoral Neck.

    18 September 2018

    In contrast to traditional approaches to fracture risk assessment using clinical risk factors and bone mineral density (BMD), a new technique, reference point microindentation (RPI), permits direct assessment of bone quality; in vivo tibial RPI measurements appear to discriminate patients with a fragility fracture from controls. However, it is unclear how this relates to the site of the most clinically devastating fracture, the femoral neck, and whether RPI provides information complementary to that from existing assessments. Femoral neck samples were collected at surgery after low-trauma hip fracture (n = 46; 17 male; aged 83 [interquartile range 77-87] years) and compared, using RPI (Biodent Hfc), with 16 cadaveric control samples, free from bone disease (7 male; aged 65 [IQR 61-74] years). A subset of fracture patients returned for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) assessment (Hologic Discovery) and, for the controls, a micro-computed tomography setup (HMX, Nikon) was used to replicate DXA scans. The indentation depth was greater in femoral neck samples from osteoporotic fracture patients than controls (p < 0.001), which persisted with adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and height (p < 0.001) but was site-dependent, being less pronounced in the inferomedial region. RPI demonstrated good discrimination between fracture and controls using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.79 to 0.89), and a model combining RPI to clinical risk factors or BMD performed better than the individual components (AUC = 0.88 to 0.99). In conclusion, RPI at the femoral neck discriminated fracture cases from controls independent of BMD and traditional risk factors but dependent on location. The clinical RPI device may, therefore, supplement risk assessment and requires testing in prospective cohorts and comparison between the clinically accessible tibia and the femoral neck. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  • Incidence and Predictors of Multiple Fractures Despite High Adherence to Oral Bisphosphonates: A Binational Population-Based Cohort Study.

    18 September 2018

    Oral bisphosphonates (BPs) are highly effective in preventing fractures and are recommended first-line therapies for patients with osteoporosis. We identified the incidence and predictors of oral BP treatment failure, defined as the incidence of two or more fractures while on treatment (≥2 FWOT) among users with high adherence. Fractures were considered from 6 months after treatment initiation and up to 6 months after discontinuation. Data from computerized records and pharmacy invoices were obtained from Sistema d'Informació per al Desenvolupament de l'Investigació en Atenció Primària (SIDIAP; Catalonia, Spain) and Danish Health Registries (Denmark) for all incident users of oral BPs in 2006-2007 and 2000-2001, respectively. Fine and Gray survival models using backward-stepwise selection (p-entry 0.049; p- exit 0.10) and accounting for the competing risk of therapy cessation were used to identify predictors of ≥2 FWOT among patients having persisted with treatment ≥6 months with overall medication possession ratio (MPR) ≥80%. Incidence of ≥2 FWOT was 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8 to 3.2) and 1.7 (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.2) per 1000 patient-years (PYs) within Catalonia and Denmark, respectively. Older age was predictive of ≥2 FWOT in both Catalonian and Danish cohorts: subhazard ratio (SHR) = 2.28 (95% CI, 1.11 to 4.68) and SHR = 2.61 (95% CI, 0.98 to 6.95), respectively, for 65 to <80 years; and SHR = 3.19 (95% CI, 1.33 to 7.69) and SHR = 4.88 (95% CI, 1.74 to 13.7), respectively, for ≥80 years. Further significant predictors of ≥2 FWOT identified within only one cohort were dementia, SHR = 4.46 (95% CI, 1.02 to 19.4) (SIDIAP); and history of recent or older fracture, SHR = 3.40 (95% CI, 1.50 to 7.68) and SHR = 2.08 (95% CI: 1.04-4.15), respectively (Denmark). Even among highly adherent users of oral BP therapy, a minority sustain multiple fractures while on treatment. Older age was predictive of increased risk within both study populations, as was history of recent/old fracture and dementia within one but not both populations. Additional and/or alternative strategies should be investigated for these patients.

  • Combined chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine for painful knee osteoarthritis: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority trial versus celecoxib.

    18 September 2018

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of chondroitin sulfate plus glucosamine hydrochloride (CS+GH) versus celecoxib in patients with knee osteoarthritis and severe pain. METHODS: Double-blind Multicentre Osteoarthritis interVEntion trial with SYSADOA (MOVES) conducted in France, Germany, Poland and Spain evaluating treatment with CS+GH versus celecoxib in 606 patients with Kellgren and Lawrence grades 2-3 knee osteoarthritis and moderate-to-severe pain (Western Ontario and McMaster osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) score ≥301; 0-500 scale). Patients were randomised to receive 400 mg CS plus 500 mg GH three times a day or 200 mg celecoxib every day for 6 months. The primary outcome was the mean decrease in WOMAC pain from baseline to 6 months. Secondary outcomes included WOMAC function and stiffness, visual analogue scale for pain, presence of joint swelling/effusion, rescue medication consumption, Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials and Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) criteria and EuroQoL-5D. RESULTS: The adjusted mean change (95% CI) in WOMAC pain was -185.7 (-200.3 to -171.1) (50.1% decrease) with CS+GH and -186.8 (-201.7 to -171.9) (50.2% decrease) with celecoxib, meeting the non-inferiority margin of -40: -1.11 (-22.0 to 19.8; p=0.92). All sensitivity analyses were consistent with that result. At 6 months, 79.7% of patients in the combination group and 79.2% in the celecoxib group fulfilled OMERACT-OARSI criteria. Both groups elicited a reduction >50% in the presence of joint swelling; a similar reduction was seen for effusion. No differences were observed for the other secondary outcomes. Adverse events were low and similarly distributed between groups. CONCLUSIONS: CS+GH has comparable efficacy to celecoxib in reducing pain, stiffness, functional limitation and joint swelling/effusion after 6 months in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis, with a good safety profile. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01425853.

  • Ankylosing spondylitis confers substantially increased risk of clinical spine fractures: a nationwide case-control study.

    18 September 2018

    UNLABELLED: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) leads to osteopenia/osteoporosis and spine rigidity. We conducted a case-control study and found that AS-affected patients have a 5-fold and 50% increased risk of clinical spine and all clinical fractures, respectively. Excess risk of both is highest in the first years and warrants an early bone health assessment after diagnosis. INTRODUCTION: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is related to spine rigidity and reduced bone mass, but data on its impact on fracture risk are scarce. We aimed to study the association between AS and clinical fractures using a case-control design. METHODS: From the Danish Health Registries, we identified all subjects who sustained a fracture in the year 2000 (cases) and matched up to three controls by year of birth, gender and region. Clinically diagnosed AS was identified using International Classification of Diseases, 8th revision (ICD-8; 71249), and International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10; M45) codes. We also studied the impact of AS duration. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for non-traumatic fractures (any site, clinical spine and non-vertebral) according to AS status and time since AS diagnosis. Multivariate models were adjusted for fracture history, socio-economic status, previous medical consultations, alcoholism and use of oral glucocorticoids. RESULTS: We identified 139/124,655 (0.11%) AS fracture cases, compared to 271/373,962 (0.07%) AS controls. Unadjusted (age- and gender-matched) odds ratio (OR) were 1.54 [95% confidence interval (95%CI) 1.26-1.89] for any fracture, 5.42 [2.50-11.70] for spine and 1.39 [1.12-1.73] for non-vertebral fracture. The risk peaked in the first 2.5 years following AS diagnosis: OR 2.69 [1.84-3.92] for any fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with AS have a 5-fold higher risk of clinical spine fracture and a 35% increased risk of non-vertebral fracture. This excess risk peaks early, in the first 2.5 years of AS disease. Patients should be assessed for fracture risk early after AS diagnosis.

  • The relative risk of aortic aneurysm in patients with giant cell arteritis compared with the general population of the UK.

    18 September 2018

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the risk of aortic aneurysm in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) compared with age-, gender- and location-matched controls. METHODS: A UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD) parallel cohort study of 6999 patients with GCA and 41 994 controls, matched on location, age and gender, was carried out. A competing risk model using aortic aneurysm as the primary outcome and non-aortic-aneurysm-related death as the competing risk was used to determine the relative risk (subhazard ratio) between non-GCA and GCA subjects, after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. RESULTS: Comparing the GCA cohort with the non-GCA cohort, the adjusted subhazard ratio (95% CI) for aortic aneurysm was 1.92 (1.52 to 2.41). Significant predictors of aortic aneurysm were being an ex-smoker (2.64 (2.03 to 3.43)) or a current smoker (3.37 (2.61 to 4.37)), previously taking antihypertensive drugs (1.57 (1.23 to 2.01)) and a history of diabetes (0.32 (0.19 to 0.56)) or cardiovascular disease (1.98 (1.50 to 2.63)). In a multivariate model of the GCA cohort, male gender (2.10 (1.38 to 3.19)), ex-smoker (2.20 (1.22 to 3.98)), current smoker (3.79 (2.20 to 6.53)), previous antihypertensive drugs (1.62 (1.00 to 2.61)) and diabetes (0.19 (0.05 to 0.77)) were significant predictors of aortic aneurysm. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with GCA have a twofold increased risk of aortic aneurysm, and this should be considered within the range of other risk factors including male gender, age and smoking. A separate screening programme is not indicated. The protective effect of diabetes in the development of aortic aneurysms in patients with GCA is also demonstrated.

  • NASHA hyaluronic acid vs. methylprednisolone for knee osteoarthritis: a prospective, multi-centre, randomized, non-inferiority trial.

    18 September 2018

    OBJECTIVE: To compare NASHA hyaluronic acid gel as single-injection intra-articular (IA) treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA) against methylprednisolone acetate (MPA). DESIGN: This was a prospective, multi-centre, randomized, active-controlled, double-blind, non-inferiority clinical trial. A unique, open-label extension phase (OLE) was undertaken to answer further important clinical questions. Subjects with painful unilateral knee OA were treated and followed for 26 weeks (blinded phase). All patients attending the clinic at 26 weeks were offered NASHA treatment, with a subsequent 26-week follow-up period (extension phase). The primary objective was to show non-inferiority of NASHA vs MPA in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain responder rate (percentage of patients with ≥40% improvement from baseline in WOMAC pain score and an absolute improvement of ≥5 points) at 12 weeks. RESULTS: In total, 442 participants were enrolled. The primary objective was met, with NASHA producing a non-inferior response rate vs MPA at 12 weeks (NASHA: 44.6%; MPA: 46.2%; difference [95% CI]: 1.6% [-11.2%; +7.9%]). Effect size for WOMAC pain, physical function and stiffness scores favoured NASHA over MPA from 12 to 26 weeks. In response to NASHA treatment at 26 weeks, sustained improvements were seen in WOMAC outcomes irrespective of initial treatment. No serious device-related adverse events (AEs) were reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that single-injection NASHA was well tolerated and non-inferior to MPA at 12 weeks. The benefit of NASHA was maintained to 26 weeks while that of MPA declined. An injection of NASHA at 26 weeks conferred long-term improvements without increased sensitivity or risk of complications. STUDY IDENTIFIER: NCT01209364 (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

  • Temporal trends and geographical variation in the use of subacromial decompression and rotator cuff repair of the shoulder in England.

    18 September 2018

    We explored the trends over time and the geographical variation in the use of subacromial decompression and rotator cuff repair in 152 local health areas (Primary Care Trusts) across England. The diagnostic and procedure codes of patients undergoing certain elective shoulder operations between 2000/2001 and 2009/2010 were extracted from the Hospital Episode Statistics database. They were grouped as 1) subacromial decompression only, 2) subacromial decompression with rotator cuff repair, and 3) rotator cuff repair only. The number of patients undergoing subacromial decompression alone rose by 746.4% from 2523 in 2000/2001 (5.2/100 000 (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.0 to 5.4) to 21 355 in 2009/2010 (40.2/100 000 (95% CI 39.7 to 40.8)). Operations for rotator cuff repair alone peaked in 2008/2009 (4.7/100 000 (95% CI 4.5 to 4.8)) and declined considerably in 2009/2010 (2.6/100 000 (95% CI 2.5 to 2.7)). Given the lack of evidence for the effectiveness of these operations and the significant increase in the number of procedures being performed in England and elsewhere, there is an urgent need for well-designed clinical trials to determine evidence of clinical effectiveness.

  • Fracture prevention in patients with cognitive impairment presenting with a hip fracture: secondary analysis of data from the HORIZON Recurrent Fracture Trial.

    18 September 2018

    UNLABELLED: Patients with cognitive impairment (CI) often do not receive secondary fracture prevention. Use of zoledronic acid led to a similar reduction in re-fracture risk but the survival benefit was limited to those without CI. INTRODUCTION: We tested whether the effects of zoledronic acid (Zol) on re-fracture and mortality differed in patients presenting with a hip fracture by cognitive status. METHODS: We used data from the Health Outcomes and Reduced Incidence with Zoledronic Acid Once Yearly Recurrent Fracture Trial, of yearly intravenous 5 mg Zol vs. placebo in patients presenting with a hip fracture. Primary outcome was new fracture and secondary outcome mortality. Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) with a cut-point of >2 was used to identify CI. Fine-Gray models for competing events were fitted to study the effect of Zol on re-fracture and Cox regression for death. A multiplicative term was introduced to study a potential interaction between treatment and cognitive status on outcomes. RESULTS: Baseline SPMSQ of 1,966/2,127 (92.4%) patients was measured. Three hundred fifty (17.8%) had CI, balanced between treatment arms. In the placebo arm, there was similar fracture incidence between those with and without CI (15.4 vs. 12.3%, p = 0.26). There was no significant interaction for the effect of CI on Zol and re-fracture (p = 0.66). CI was associated with higher 1-year mortality (12.6 vs. 4.3%, p < 0.001) and the interaction was bordering significance (interaction, p = 0.066). Zol prolonged survival only in patients with normal cognitive status [HR 0.56 (95% CI 0.40-0.80)] and not in those with CI [HR 0.90 (95% CI 0.59-1.38)]. CONCLUSIONS: While these results require confirmation, the findings support the use of bisphosphonates in patients with osteoporotic fracture and CI expected to live for more than 6 months.

  • Predictors of fracture while on treatment with oral bisphosphonates: a population-based cohort study.

    18 September 2018

    Although oral bisphosphonates (BPs) are highly effective in preventing fractures, some patients will fracture while on treatment. We identified predictors of such fractures in a population-based cohort of incident users of oral BPs. We screened the Sistema d'Informació per al Desenvolupament de l'Investigació en Atenció Primària (SIDIAP) database to identify new users of oral BPs in 2006-2007. SIDIAP includes pharmacy invoice data and primary care electronic medical records for a representative 5 million people in Catalonia (Spain). Exclusion criteria were the following: Paget disease; <40 years of age; and any antiosteoporosis treatment in the previous year. A priori defined risk factors included age, gender, body mass index, vitamin D deficiency, smoking, alcohol drinking, preexisting comorbidities, and medications. Fractures were considered if they appeared at least 6 months after treatment initiation. "Fractures while on treatment" were defined as those occurring among participants persisting for at least 6 months and with an overall high compliance (medication possession ratio ≥80%). Fine and Gray survival models accounting for competing risk with therapy discontinuation were fitted to identify key predictors. Only 7449 of 21,385 (34.8%) participants completed >6 months of therapy. Incidence of fracture while on treatment was 3.4/100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-3.7). Predictors of these among patients persisting and adhering to treatment included: older age (subhazard ratio [SHR] for 60 to <80 years, 2.18 [95% CI, 1.70-2.80]; for ≥80 years, 2.5 [95% CI, 1.82-3.43]); previous fracture (1.75 [95% CI, 1.39-2.20] and 2.49 [95% CI, 1.98-3.13], in the last 6 months and longer, respectively); underweight, 2.11 (95% CI, 1.14-3.92); inflammatory arthritis, 1.46 (95% CI, 1.02-2.10); use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.02-1.46); and vitamin D deficiency, 2.69 (95% CI, 1.27-5.72). Even among high compliers, 3.4% of oral BP users will fracture every year. Older age, underweight, vitamin D deficiency, PPI use, previous fracture, and inflammatory arthritides increase risk. Monitoring strategies and/or alternative therapies should be considered for these patients.