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Emeritus Professor Angela Vincent received the Research Recognition Award, clinical science, at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society.

The AES is a medical and scientific society whose members are dedicated to advancing research and education for preventing, treating and curing epilepsy. The AES  Research Recognition Awards are given annually to active scientists and clinicians working in all aspects of epilepsy research. The awards recognise professional excellence reflected in a distinguished history of research of important promise for the improved understanding and treatment of epilepsy. These awards include a $10,000 honorarium.The clinical science award was shared by Angela Vincent and J Dalmau.

As an honorary consultant in immunology, Angela Vincent established and directed the Oxford Neuroimmunology Service from 1992-2016. She was president of the International Society of Neuroimmunology (2001-2004), Head of the Department of Clinical Neurology (2005- 2008), and associate editor of Oxford Academic's Brain (2004-2013).

Although she is not a neurologist, Professor Vincent received the 2009 Association of British Neurologists medal and the 2017 World Federation for Neurology (WFN) Medal for scientific contributions to neurology. In 2018, she received the Klaus Joachim Zülch Prize with two other doctors. She was elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences in 2002 and Fellow of the Royal Society of London in 2011.

Angela's interests include clinical and serological studies on patients with neuromuscular junction disorders and acquired disorders of the central nervous system associated with antibodies to receptors, ion channels and associated proteins, which causes a wide range of issues including amnesia, seizures, psychiatric and movement disorders. She also pioneered the role of maternal antibodies in causing neuronal pathology that could influence susceptibility to developmental and other neurological diseases. She received her M.B.B.S. and M.Sc. in biochemistry from University College of London.