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Wouldn’t it be great to be able to hear what people whispered behind your back? Or to read the bus timetable from across the street?

We all differ dramatically in our perceptual abilities – for all our senses. But do we have to accept what we’ve got when it comes to sensory perception? Or can we actually do something to improve it?

Read the full article on The Conversation website, written by Harriet Dempsey-Jones.

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