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The Professor of Behavioural Sleep Medicine in the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences talks on BBC Radio Scotland about the link between poor sleep and depression, diabetes and heart disease.

On the day that the clocks went back and gave us all an extra hour in bed, a BBC Radio Scotland presenter explored what's stopping one in five Scots from getting a good night's sleep.

During the programme Colin Espie, Professor of Behavioural Sleep Medicine, reveals that sleep has more impact than was previously thought on both our mental and physical health, with poor sleep now being closely associated with conditions like depression, diabetes and heart disease.

Listen again on BBC iPlayer (02:00 on the clock)

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