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Gabe de Luca

Congratulations to Associate Professor Gabriele De Luca who has been selected by The British Neuropathological Society to receive the Society's 2016 Cavanagh Prize for his work on the neuropathology of demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system. 

The biannual award recognises a significant contribution that a young neuroscientist's studies have made to the understanding of the Neuropathology of Human or Veterinary Neurological Disease. 

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MSc Clinical and Therapeutic Neuroscience: Class 2021/22 Prizes

Congratulations to our MSc in Clinical and Therapeutic Neuroscience, Class of 2021/22 for successfully completing the course.