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Researchers in our Department working on Motor Neuron Disease (MND) do the Ice Bucket Challenge, which has taken the internet by storm this week and so far raised £6 million.

The team wanted to do their bit to raise money for research into this devastating disease. From left to right they are: Lucy Farrimond, David Gordon, Louisa Kent, Jakub Scaber, Kevin Talbot, Martin Turner and Thomas Vizard. 

It was great to take part in the Ice Bucket Challenge. It raises awareness for a devastating disease and I hope people will continue to donate to help us find a cure for Motor Neuron Disease. - Professor Kevin Talbot

MND is a rapidly progressive and fatal disease, which can affect any adult at any time and attacks the motor neurones that send messages from the brain to the muscles, leaving people unable to walk, talk or feed themselves.

The cause of the disease is currently unknown and there is no known cure. Around 5,000 people in the UK have MND at any one time, with half of people with the disease dying within 14 months of diagnosis. It kills five people every day in the UK.

Research in the Oxford Motor Neuron Disease Centre aims to improve understanding of motor neuron diseases, principally amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), to find treatments to improve the lives of patients with these currently incurable conditions.

The Motor Neurone Disease (MND) Association  funds research to understand what causes MND, how to diagnose it and, most importantly, how to effectively treat it so that it no longer devastates lives.

Denise Davies, Head of Community Fundraising at the MND Association, said: “Without the amazing support of people who contribute, the Association simply would not be able to provide its vital support services and fund research to find a cure. Together we are making a real difference for people affected by this devastating disease.”

Donate by visiting www.mndassociation.org or text ICED55 (with amount of your donation)

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