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On 24 September 2016, the Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Trials Unit hosted 102 patients and family members/carers at the Unipart Conference Centre in Oxford.

In the morning Dr Matthew Craner updated everyone on the topics presented at a recent MS conference and Dr Jacqueline Palace talked about the UK Risk Sharing Scheme, which helped make second-line treatments more available for patients with MS.

Fascinating set of presentations. Complicated sciences presented in an accessible and interesting way. Well done to all.
- Patient attendee

Several early-career researchers then presented the projects they are currently working on in the field of MS. During lunch there were posters from researchers detailing their research as well as an opportunity to get information leaflets from a local MS Society branch and sign up for the brain bank.

In the afternoon three key speakers gave detailed presentations on stem cells (Dr Andrew Weir), using clinical data to improve treatment of MS (Professor Paul Matthews), and genetics (Professor Lars Fugger).

 

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