Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience has been awarded the Athena Swan Bronze Award for its efforts to improve the representation of women in science through its internal initiatives. The Athena Swan initiative in NDCN is being led by Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg and Dr Helen Higham.

Bronze Award holders must:

  • Demonstrate particular challenges and plan activities for the future.
  • Use quantitative and qualitative assessment to identify challenges and opportunities.
  • Have a plan that builds on this assessment, and lessons from any activities already in place.

The April 2012 award round was the biggest Athena SWAN has ever had with 96 award submissions and 14 panels. The Athena SWAN Charter evolved from work between the Athena Project and the Scientific Women’s Academic Network (SWAN), to advance the representation of women in science, engineering and technology.

For more information please visit the Athena Swan website.

Similar stories

Jaideep Pandit honoured with RCoA Gold Medal

Congratulations are in order for Professor Jaideep Pandit, Professor of Anaesthesia and consultant anaesthetist, who has received the rarely awarded prestigious Gold Medal of the Royal College of Anaesthetists. Professor Pandit was a student and research fellow at DPAG and is now an Academic Visitor in the department; he is also a Fellow and Tutor in Medicine at St John's College.

New study shows clinical symptoms for Alzheimer’s can be predicted in preclinical models

Establishing preclinical models of Alzheimer’s that reflect in-life clinical symptoms of each individual is a critically important goal, yet so far it has not been fully realised. A new collaborative study from the University of Oxford has demonstrated that clinical vulnerability to an abnormally abundant protein in Alzheimer’s brain is in fact reflected in individual patient induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons.

MSc Clinical and Therapeutic Neuroscience: Class 2021/22 Prizes

Congratulations to our MSc in Clinical and Therapeutic Neuroscience, Class of 2021/22 for successfully completing the course.

Oxford receives £122m funding for healthcare research

Health and care research in Oxford is to receive £122 million in government funding over the next five years to improve diagnosis, treatment and care for NHS patients. Our department will play a major role.