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Mr Erlick Pereira, who works with the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neuroscience's Alex Green and Tipu Aziz, has been awarded a prestigious Hunterian Professorship by the Royal College of Surgeons of England for 2014 and 2015.

Named after the pioneering surgeon scientist John Hunter and dating back over two centuries, past recipients of the Professorship include Fleming, Treves, Spencer-Wells, Penfield, Darzi, Trotter and Moynihan. 

Erlick is an ST7 neurosurgical registrar who gained both his FRCS(Neuro.Surg) and a DM last year for research into deep brain surgery for pain, advised by Mr Alex Green. He has been a prolific member of Professor Tipu Aziz’s group since joining as a medical student a decade ago, having published around 50 papers with them and another 40 in other areas of surgery and neuroscience. 

Tipu and Erlick have just written the basal ganglia chapter of the forthcoming 41st edition of Gray’s Anatomy and he and Alex have co-authored a soon to be published book, Surgery of the Autonomic Nervous System.  He was also recently awarded the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Ron Tasker Award and American Association of Neurological Surgeons William Sweet Award for his work on neurosurgery for pain. 

His Hunterian lecture about the midbrain periaqueductal grey will be delivered to the Society of British Neurological Surgeons and published in Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England.

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