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Hilary Edgcombe, with two colleagues in other centres, has co-edited a new Oxford Handbook addressing safe anaesthesia in resource-limited settings

Hilary Edgcombe and book jacket

This is the first handbook dedicated to the provision of anaesthesia in challenging environments. It covers obstetrics, paediatrics, burns, pain, trauma, and critical care.

This book provided a great opportunity to collaborate with co-editors Rachael Craven and Ben Gupta as well as with authors from all over the world, to promote safer anaesthesia in difficult circumstances and a wide variety of contexts.
- Hilary Edgcombe

Published in the Oxford University Press series 'Oxford Specialist Handbooks in Anaesthesia', this resource is written by international experts with a wealth of experience administering anaesthesia in elective and emergency settings across the globe.

It contains comprehensive instructions on preoperative and perioperative instructions across a swathe of specialties.

Read more on the OUP website.

 

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