Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The new small-animal scanner for our Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging is lifted into place at the Biomedical Services Building

Rodent MRI scanner being installed

The installation of this new small bore 7T MRI scanner heralds exciting new opportunities to image and discover more about the brain across species.

The ability to record comparable signals and study comparable behaviours across species allows us to address causal and mechanistic questions in animal models and translate these findings directly to humans.

We aim to discover cross-species homologies in brain anatomy, functional specialisation and computation. Outputs will include cross-species brain atlases as well as a shared repository of cross-species behavioural paradigms.

This will not only provide fundamental new scientific knowledge but will also enable mechanistic questions that are addressed in rodent and macaque models, to be seamlessly translated to human and clinical populations.

Similar stories

Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowship

Dr Rezvan Farahibozorg has received one of 17 Royal Academy of Engineering Research Fellowships for 2022.

Magnetic signatures of the brain characterised in UK Biobank imaging study

A study published this week in Nature Neuroscience demonstrates how studying the magnetic properties of tissue may provide a unique window into brain health and disease.

Oxford researchers part of major UK initiative to understand chronic pain

Oxford pain researchers are playing a major role in a new multi-million pound research programme launched by a consortium of funders, including UKRI, Versus Arthritis, Eli Lilly and the Medical Research Foundation.

Professor Irene Tracey nominated as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford

Professor of Anaesthetic Neuroscience Irene Tracey, former head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, has been nominated as the next Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford.

Little understood brain region linked to how we perceive pain

A new DPAG-led review paper, published in the journal Brain, has shown that a poorly understood region of the brain called the claustrum may play an important role in how we experience pain.

Brain regions related to smell show decline following mild COVID-19

Researchers from the University of Oxford have used data from UK Biobank participants to look at changes to the brain on average 4.5 months after mild SARS-CoV-2 infection.