Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The delivery of clinical care, research, and education in neuro-rehabilitation in Oxford will be revolutionised by an innovative partnership with Quinnipiac University, Hartford, USA.

Quinnipiac students Sean Pennetti and Evan Jameyfield

The Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences (NDCN) at the University of Oxford, and the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, are already known for basic and translational neuroscience research. But delivery of neuro-rehabilitation services is fragmented, which limits clinical care and research opportunities, especially for patients with progressive MS where the needs are greatest. Quinnipiac has a nationally respected neuro-rehabilitation programme, with a comprehensive clinical care model and access to a vast longitudinal clinical, biofluid, and imaging repository for research.

The aim is for Oxford to become a world-leading centre of excellence in restorative neuroscience.
- Associate Professor Gabriele De Luca

The partnership has been negotiated by Associate Professor Gabriele De Luca, Director of Clinical Neurosciences Undergraduate Education in the Medical Sciences Division at the University of Oxford. Together with senior leadership in NDCN, he has secured $3.6m for Phase One of the partnership. Contributions have been made by Quinnipiac University, Trinity Health New England, and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

 

This money will fund a five-year medical student exchange programme starting this July. The four medical school participants, who were selected through a competitive application process, are Sean Pennetti and Evan Jameyfield from Quinnipiac and Lucy Kirkwood and Matthew Williams from Oxford. In September, Sam Baskharoun and Vidhi Rao from Quinnipiac and James Towner and Hibatullah Abuelgasim of Oxford will take part in the programme.

Dr Robert Krug, the William and Barbara Weldon Chair and director of the Institute for Rehabilitation Medicine at the Netter School at Quinnipiac, will join Dr De Luca in leading the exchange programme.

‘This the first phase of a partnership that we hope will result in a long-term sustainable relationship between Quinnipiac, Oxford and Mount Sinai,’ said Krug, who also is president and executive medical director of Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital. ‘Not only is this an incredible opportunity for medical students at the Netter School and the University of Oxford, but we believe both institutions will benefit from the collaboration.’

Future plans include the funding of two research fellowship posts. It is envisaged that Quinnipiac’s clinical team will provide rehabilitation expertise so that Oxford can create a comprehensive care centre for progressive MS that integrates clinical care, research, and education.

Similar stories

Bioelectronic implant offers an intelligent therapy to treat incontinence

The first participants in a clinical trial of a bioelectrical therapy to treat incontinence have received their 'smart' bioelectronic implants.

Direct evidence of reduced NMDA receptors in people with form of encephalitis

NMDAR-antibody encephalitis is an autoimmune brain condition caused by patient’s own antibodies that bind to NMDA (N-Methyl-D-Aspartate) receptors in the synapses between nerve cells.

New study shows clinical symptoms for Alzheimer’s can be predicted in preclinical models

Establishing preclinical models of Alzheimer’s that reflect in-life clinical symptoms of each individual is a critically important goal, yet so far it has not been fully realised. A new collaborative study from the University of Oxford has demonstrated that clinical vulnerability to an abnormally abundant protein in Alzheimer’s brain is in fact reflected in individual patient induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons.

New insights gained into how the brain encodes information about the world

Scientists have developed a new way to test the theory that active neurons can change what they signal in the world, rather than keeping a stable correspondence to things (such as a features of an object, or ideas).

Oxford and Quinnipiac researchers discuss integrated clinical care, education, and research in multiple sclerosis

Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital's Mandell Center for Multiple Sclerosis Care and Neuroscience Research welcomed University of Oxford partners in September. Stakeholders from University of Oxford and Quinnipiac University met to discuss ongoing research and future opportunities to develop a Mandell MS Center concept of care in the UK.