Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Pedalling like Chris Froome or Alberto Contador might seem appealing, but researchers from our Department have found that for most of us it’s likely to reduce rather than improve our performance.

A team led by Dr Federico Formenti looked at a common measure of aerobic fitness called VO2 max. While it can be measured accurately in a laboratory, it is often more practical to use techniques that estimate VO2 max for individuals by getting them to exercise to their maximal level. These include the ‘bleep test’ of shuttle runs used by police forces and the Royal Air Force among others, or tests using a cycle ergometer, also known as an ‘exercise bike’. 

Read more on the University website...

Similar stories

Research shows how the brain reorganises old memories when new ones are made

MRC BNDU Research

Researchers have discovered that the arrangement of existing memories in the brain is altered when we embed new memories

Capturing immune cells that colonise the brain to prevent disease progression in multiple sclerosis

Clinical Neurology Research

Researchers have revealed a disease-causing population of immune cells, which travel to the brain in patients with multiple sclerosis. They demonstrate how to trap these cells in the blood, which means they can be targeted to prevent disease progression.

New machine learning system developed to identify deteriorating patients in hospital

Anaesthetics Research

Researchers have developed a machine learning algorithm that could improve clinicians’ ability to identify hospitalised patients who need intensive care.

Accidental awareness in obstetric surgery under general anaesthesia more frequent than expected

Anaesthetics Research

The largest ever study of awareness during obstetric general anaesthesia shows around 1 in 250 women may be affected, and some may experience long-term psychological harm.