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The American Academy of Neurology and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society are awarding the 2013 John Dystel Prize for MS Research to George C. Ebers, MD, a leading researcher with the University of Oxford and Oxford University Hospitals Trust in Oxford, United Kingdom. Ebers will receive the award at the Academy’s 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, March 16-23, 2013. The Annual Meeting is the world’s largest gathering of neurologists with more than 10,000 attendees and more than 2,300 scientific presentations on the latest research advancements in brain disease.

The John Dystel Prize recognizes a significant contribution to research in the understanding, treatment or prevention of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Ebers’ research has focused on genetic and environmental influences on MS risks.

“We have found that MS risk factors previously considered to be genetic can be changed based on environment, strongly implicating gene-environment interaction. Our studies highlight how climate and diet relate to factors leading to MS, which can be views as a largely preventable disease. Vitamin D exposure appears to be the main factor determining geographical risk” said Ebers. This award is made possible through a special contribution from the John Dystel Multiple Sclerosis Research Fund at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. “John Dystel was an MS patient I saw while I was working in New York, so it is very gratifying to receive this award in his honor,” said Ebers. 

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 25,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis. 

Source: American Academy of Neurology

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