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Today the UK funding bodies have published the results of the UK’s most recent national research assessment exercise, the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021.

Research from the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences was submitted to Unit of Assessment 4 (UA4) along with research from Psychiatry and Experimental Psychology. In UA4, 69% of Oxford’s submission was judged to be 4* (the highest score available, for research quality that is world-leading in terms of originality, significance, and rigour). Our results are complemented by outstanding results from the other areas of Medical Sciences.

Paul Harrison, Chair of the University of Oxford Neuroscience Committee, said:

'I am delighted with our performance in REF2021 Unit of Assessment 4 (Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience), and pay tribute to all our researchers, and other staff, whose sustained efforts and excellence over the past seven years made it possible.

69% of our overall REF submission was rated as world-leading (4*). Notably, this included 100% of our research environment, reflecting the success of our scientific strategy, our support for our researchers, our infrastructure, and our collaborations and contributions to the field. This environment enabled us to carry out research of substantial impact (90% rated as 4*) and high quality (53% of outputs rated as 4*).

We are committed to maintaining our efforts and enhancing our achievements in Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience. We already have exciting developments underway in terms of recruitment, investment and infrastructure, as well as strengthening our approaches to equality and diversity, access, and reproducibility.'

Read more on the University of Oxford website.

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