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We are looking forward to welcoming Dr Ben Seymour to our Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging.

Dr Seymour has received a Senior Research Fellowship in Clinical Science on ‘Neural mechanisms of endogenous analgesia’. His appointment is a joint one between the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences and the Oxford Institute for Biomedical Engineering and will start on 1 April 2020.

'I am excited to join so many young and creative colleagues working in Oxford, especially with respect to the existing strengths in pain and computational neuroscience. I'm looking forward to developing many new collaborations across the clinical and engineering spectrum'.
- Ben Seymour

BenSeymour.jpgBen's work addresses the computational and systems neuroscience of pain. This research is part theoretical: building realistic models of neuronal information processes to understand processes of pain perception and behaviour, and part experimental: testing these theories using a range of experimental methodologies, especially fMRI.

A particular focus of his research is on endogenous analgesia: understanding why pain is modulated by so many factors, and how this helps the pain system optimise protection against arm. Ultimately, this research aims to develop new technology-based therapies for treating pain in clinical populations.

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