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Tuesday 25 September saw the 'topping out' ceremony, with completion on course for next summer

Group of people in high vis and hard hats on top of new building

The new building, supported by generous funding from the Wolfson Foundation and the Wellcome Trust, will provide purpose-built facilities for the Wolfson Centre for the Prevention of Stroke and Dementia (CPSD), as well as research space for the Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging (WIN). Both of these units are part of the University’s Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences within the Medical Sciences Division.

The work of the Centre for the Prevention of Stroke and Dementia has already led to major changes in clinical practice, such as promoting emergency treatment after minor warning events to improve stroke prevention. The expansion of the centre will ensure that research continues to lead to benefits for patients.

Researchers at the Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging are working to understand how the brain works, investigating the underlying causes of conditions such as dementia, psychiatric disorders and vascular disease. The new building will house a number of research groups, such as those investigating how the brain recovers after damage and how the brain processes pain.

The building has been designed by Oxford-based architects FJMT and will be built by main contractor SDC. The building façade is made up of four main materials including glass, terracotta and wood, as well as bronze panelling. Natural ventilation is provided through vertical ventilation slats that are incorporated into the window design.

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