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Stroke remains the biggest cause of disability in the UK, and completely changed the life of celebrated broadcaster and political journalist Andrew Marr in 2013. The life-threatening stroke resulted in his family being told twice that he was unlikely to survive, and if he did, that he may never regain normal speech, cognitive function or movement.

None © Icon Films/BBC
Andrew underwent tDCS and physiotherapy in an attempt to improve his motor function

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