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The Stroke Prevention Research Unit has been awarded the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education, the highest form of national recognition that UK higher education institutions can achieve.

Peter Rothwell receives the prize with Professor Andrew Hamilton Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford © HM The Queen and British Ceremonial Arts Limited
Peter Rothwell receives the prize with Professor Andrew Hamilton Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford

The Prize, announced last night at St James’s Palace, London, recognises the Unit's outstanding work in preventive medicine. The Unit was founded by Professor Peter Rothwell. In little over a decade, it has revolutionised clinical practice in stroke prevention, ranging from emergency treatment of “threatened” stroke to more effective use of surgery (carotid endarterectomy – removal of a blockage in the carotid artery) to prevent stroke. 

Read more on the University website...

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