Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

OBJECTIVE: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) coinfection may influence HIV-1 disease progression during infancy. Our aim was to describe the incidence of CMV infection and the kinetics of viral replication in Kenyan HIV-infected and HIV-exposed uninfected infants. METHODS: HIV-1 and CMV plasma viral loads were serially measured in 20 HIV-exposed uninfected and 44 HIV-infected infants born to HIV-infected mothers. HIV-infected children were studied for the first 2 years of life, and HIV-exposed uninfected infants were studied for 1 year. RESULTS: CMV DNA was detected frequently during the first months of life; by 3 months of age, CMV DNA was detected in 90% of HIV-exposed uninfected infants and 93% of infants who had acquired HIV-1 in utero. CMV viral loads were highest in the 1-3 months following the first detection of virus and declined rapidly thereafter. CMV peak viral loads were significantly higher in the HIV-infected infants compared with the HIV-exposed uninfected infants (mean 3.2 versus 2.7 log10 CMV DNA copies/ml, respectively, P = 0.03). The detection of CMV DNA persisted to 7-9 months post-CMV infection in both the HIV-exposed uninfected (8/17, 47%) and HIV-infected (13/18, 72%, P = 0.2) children. Among HIV-infected children, CMV DNA was detected in three of the seven (43%) surviving infants tested between 19 and 21 months post-CMV infection. Finally, a strong correlation was found between peak CMV and HIV-1 viral loads (rho = 0.40, P = 0.008). CONCLUSION: Acute CMV coinfection is common in HIV-infected Kenyan infants. HIV-1 infection was associated with impaired containment of CMV replication.

Original publication

DOI

10.1097/QAD.0b013e32833016e8

Type

Journal article

Journal

AIDS

Publication Date

23/10/2009

Volume

23

Pages

2173 - 2181

Keywords

AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections, Child, Preschool, Cytomegalovirus, Cytomegalovirus Infections, DNA, Viral, Disease Progression, Female, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Kenya, Male, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Viral Load, Virus Replication