Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is probably aetiologically heterogeneous. Systematic genetic epidemiological and molecular genetic studies have provided important insights. Both genetic and non-genetic (environment, stochastic) factors may be involved in susceptibility as well as outcome, but we have yet to understand their relative roles. Any environmental factor is likely to be ubiquitous and act on a population-basis rather than within the family microenvironment. Taken together, the results of genome screening studies provide strong evidence for exclusion of a major locus in MS. There are, however, many genes that seem to be associated with MS. These include, but are in no way limited to, HLA classes I and II, T-cell receptor beta, CTLA4, ICAM1, and SH2D2A. The future of MS genetics, as for most common complex disorders, will be dependent on the resources available, ranging from biological samples and comprehensive databases of clinical and epidemiological information to the development of new technologies and statistical methods.

Type

Journal article

Journal

Lancet Neurol

Publication Date

02/2004

Volume

3

Pages

104 - 110

Keywords

Antigens, CD, Antigens, Differentiation, CTLA-4 Antigen, Female, Genes, T-Cell Receptor beta, Genetic Linkage, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Major Histocompatibility Complex, Male, Multiple Sclerosis, Risk Factors