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Reward can influence visual performance, but the neural basis of this effect remains poorly understood. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how rewarding feedback affected activity in distinct areas of human visual cortex, separating rewarding feedback events after correct performance from preceding visual events. Participants discriminated oriented gratings in either hemifield, receiving auditory feedback at trial end that signaled financial reward after correct performance. Greater rewards improved performance for all but the most difficult trials. Rewarding feedback increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in striatum and orbitofrontal cortex. It also increased BOLD signals in visual areas beyond retinotopic cortex, but not in primary visual cortex representing the judged stimuli. These modulations were seen at a time point in which no visual stimuli were presented or expected, demonstrating a novel type of activity change in visual cortex that cannot reflect modulation of response to incoming or anticipated visual stimuli. Rewarded trials led on the next trial to improved performance and enhanced visual activity contralateral to the judged stimulus, for retinotopic representations of the judged visual stimuli in V1. Our findings distinguish general effects in nonretinotopic visual cortex when receiving rewarding feedback after correct performance from consequences of reward for spatially specific responses in V1.

Original publication

DOI

10.1152/jn.00870.2009

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Neurophysiol

Publication Date

09/2010

Volume

104

Pages

1746 - 1757

Keywords

Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Discrimination (Psychology), Feedback, Sensory, Female, Humans, Male, Photic Stimulation, Reward, Visual Cortex, Visual Perception, Young Adult