Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), or Devic's disease, is a rare demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that has a predilection for the optic nerve and spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required to diagnose NMO. Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis is NMO's imaging hallmark and the presence of a brain MRI that is not diagnostic of multiple sclerosis (MS) also remains part of the diagnostic criteria. It is increasingly recognised that MS and NMO brain imaging can, however, have similar appearances but differences do exist: hypothalamic, periaqueductal grey and area postrema lesions implicate NMO whilst cortical, U-fibre or Dawson's finger lesions are suggestive of MS. The timing of image acquisition, age, ethnicity and aquaporin-4 antibody status are all likely to alter the findings at MRI. This review therefore aims to overview and update the reader on NMO imaging, to provide clinically relevant guidance for diagnosing NMO and differentiating it from MS in order to guide management, and to highlight recent research insights.

Original publication

DOI

10.1177/1352458514531087

Type

Journal article

Journal

Mult Scler

Publication Date

08/2014

Volume

20

Pages

1153 - 1164

Keywords

Devic’s disease, Magnetic resonance imaging, T2 lesions, demyelination, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica