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Sleep is essential for healthy brain function and plasticity underlying learning and memory. In the context of physical impairment such as following a stroke, sleep may be particularly important for supporting critical recovery of motor function through similar processes of reorganization in the brain. Despite a link between stroke and poor sleep, current approaches to rehabilitative care often neglect the importance of sleep in clinical assessment and treatment. This review assimilates current evidence on the role of sleep in motor learning, with a focus on the implications for physical rehabilitation after stroke. We further outline practical considerations for integrating sleep assessment as a vital part of clinical care.

Original publication

DOI

10.3389/fneur.2015.00241

Type

Journal article

Journal

Front Neurol

Publication Date

2015

Volume

6

Keywords

aging, consolidation, motor memory, motor recovery, plasticity and learning, rehabilitation, sleep, stroke