Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to use the activities recorded directly from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode to address the focality and distinct nature of the local field potential (LFP) activities of different frequency. METHODS: Pre-operative and intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were acquired from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent DBS in the subthalamic nucleus and intra-operative LFP recording at rest and during cued movements. Images were reconstructed and 3-D visualized using Lead-DBS® toolbox to determine the coordinates of contact. The resting spectral power and movement-related power modulation of LFP oscillations were estimated. RESULTS: Both subthalamic LFP activity recorded at rest and its modulation by movement had focal maxima in the alpha, beta and gamma bands. The spatial distribution of alpha band activity and its modulation was significantly different to that in the beta band. Moreover, there were significant differences in the scale and timing of movement related modulation across the frequency bands. CONCLUSION: Subthalamic LFP activities within specific frequency bands can be distinguished by spatial topography and pattern of movement related modulation. SIGNIFICANCE: Assessment of the frequency, focality and pattern of movement related modulation of subthalamic LFPs reveals a heterogeneity of neural population activity in this region. This could potentially be leveraged to finesse intra-operative targeting and post-operative contact selection.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.clinph.2018.01.075

Type

Journal article

Journal

Clin Neurophysiol

Publication Date

05/2018

Volume

129

Pages

1001 - 1010

Keywords

Deep brain stimulation (DBS), Intra-operative, Oscillation, Parkinson’s disease (PD), Subthalamic nucleus (STN)