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Chrystalina Antoniades of the NeuroMetrology Lab delivered a session to these summer school delegates about her work on change blindness with the Ashmolean.

Chrystalina Antoniades presenting her work

Many of us have changed the way we exchange visual information, with the growing accessibility of high-speed internet and the capability of smart portable devices. In her talk Chrystalina described an experiment at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford that compared the perception of real-world and on-screen artefacts.

This work slightly outside my main area of research gives me a different way of looking at things, making me open and inquisitive - and a better research doctor.
- Chrystalina Antoniades

A recent report found that adults in the United States spend an average of more than 8 hours a day accessing media through a device with a screen. Such a significant shift in behaviour warrants further investigation into the differences between on-screen and real-world perception. There is already evidence to suggest that binocular stereoscopic vision (as in real-world viewing) confers an advantage over monocular vision (on-screen) in certain perception performance tasks, including the analysis of complex visual scenes.

Change blindness is a phenomenon where the viewer doesn't notice a change in an image. To date, the effect has been produced by changing images displayed on screen, as well as changing people and objects in the viewer's environment. 

Chrystalina discussed possible implications of the results of these experiments for understanding change blindness as well as future directions for research into real-world and on-screen comparisons, and the perception of artefacts in museums.

More about the NeuroMetrology Lab

More about the Art & Neuroscience Project

Read the full paper detailing the experiment

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