Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Chrystalina Antoniades of the NeuroMetrology Lab delivered a session to these summer school delegates about her work on change blindness with the Ashmolean.

Chrystalina Antoniades presenting her work

Many of us have changed the way we exchange visual information, with the growing accessibility of high-speed internet and the capability of smart portable devices. In her talk Chrystalina described an experiment at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford that compared the perception of real-world and on-screen artefacts.

This work slightly outside my main area of research gives me a different way of looking at things, making me open and inquisitive - and a better research doctor.
- Chrystalina Antoniades

A recent report found that adults in the United States spend an average of more than 8 hours a day accessing media through a device with a screen. Such a significant shift in behaviour warrants further investigation into the differences between on-screen and real-world perception. There is already evidence to suggest that binocular stereoscopic vision (as in real-world viewing) confers an advantage over monocular vision (on-screen) in certain perception performance tasks, including the analysis of complex visual scenes.

Change blindness is a phenomenon where the viewer doesn't notice a change in an image. To date, the effect has been produced by changing images displayed on screen, as well as changing people and objects in the viewer's environment. 

Chrystalina discussed possible implications of the results of these experiments for understanding change blindness as well as future directions for research into real-world and on-screen comparisons, and the perception of artefacts in museums.

More about the NeuroMetrology Lab

More about the Art & Neuroscience Project

Read the full paper detailing the experiment

Similar stories

Bioelectronic implant offers an intelligent therapy to treat incontinence

The first participants in a clinical trial of a bioelectrical therapy to treat incontinence have received their 'smart' bioelectronic implants.

Direct evidence of reduced NMDA receptors in people with form of encephalitis

NMDAR-antibody encephalitis is an autoimmune brain condition caused by patient’s own antibodies that bind to NMDA (N-Methyl-D-Aspartate) receptors in the synapses between nerve cells.

Director of MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit appointed

From 2 January 2023, Professor Peter Magill will lead the Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit (MRC BNDU) at the University of Oxford.

Study reveals association between diagnosis of a neuropsychiatric condition and severe outcome from COVID-19 infection, and other severe acute respiratory infections

New research from the University of Oxford has shown an increased risk of severe illness and death from both COVID-19 and other severe respiratory infections, such as influenza and pneumonia, among people with a pre-existing mental health condition.

New study shows clinical symptoms for Alzheimer’s can be predicted in preclinical models

Establishing preclinical models of Alzheimer’s that reflect in-life clinical symptoms of each individual is a critically important goal, yet so far it has not been fully realised. A new collaborative study from the University of Oxford has demonstrated that clinical vulnerability to an abnormally abundant protein in Alzheimer’s brain is in fact reflected in individual patient induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons.