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We explore the neuropathology of multiple sclerosis and other inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases using a multidisciplinary team approach to post-mortem brain and spinal cord tissue. The aim is that the understanding derived from these studies will translate into ideas for improved treatments for living patients.

Research strategies of our group. In the Comparative Neuropathology quadrant, we represent the different manifestations of neurodegenerative and inflammatory disease in which we are interested. In the Genetics-Pathology quadrant, we represent our interest in exploring the relationship between genes and pathologic features in post-mortem tissue. In the Transcriptomics/Proteomics-Pathology quadrant, we illustrate some current work linking multiple sclerosis pathology and its relationship to gene expression and protein alterations. In the MRI-Pathology quadrant, we illustrate axonal loss and alterations in the MRI signal of the spinal cord in multiple sclerosis. For each of these strategies, we apply rigorous quantitative neuropathological outcome measures.

We work closely with colleagues at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Genetics, FMRIB, and Immunology at Oxford, as well as the UK MS Tissue Bank at Imperial College, London, the MRI groups at the University of British Columbia and University College London, and Genetics and Genomics Sciences at Mount Sinai, New York.

Research Projects

  • Comparative Neuropathology with Cerebrovascular and Degenerative Diseases
  • Genetic-Pathology Correlations
  • Transcriptomic/Proteomic-Pathology Correlations
  • MRI-Pathology Correlations

FUNDERS

GMSI logo

Medical Research Council Logo

Oxford BRC

Selected publications

Related research themes