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We are pleased to announce that the FMRIB Graduate Programme for the 2015/2016 academic year is now open for registration.

The FMRIB Graduate Programme is a set of courses about MRI-based neuroimaging in research. These courses are primarily aimed at new Oxford students but are useful for anyone who is new to the field or wants to brush up their skills. The course runs over all three Oxford academic terms (Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity), with the core Analysis course covering two terms (Hilary and Trinity). The expected time commitment per week is 6-8 hours made up of podcasted lectures, practicals and tutorials.

 Course Summary

  1. Introduction to MRI and fMRI - an intensive course of lectures and practicals giving an overview of MRI and fMRI (Week 1 of Michaelmas term, 12-16 October)
  2. Core courses on MRI Physics and MRI Analysis - a comprehensive introduction to MRI methods aimed at researchers new to the field, with or without a technical background (Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity terms)
  3. Additional Modules - a series of shorter modules designed to provide further education, generally focused on a specific background (technical or non-technical), including Practical Maths, Probability and Statistics, Scientific Computing, Intro to Neuroscience, Analysis and Interpretation, and Advanced Physics/Analysis (Michaelmas, Hilary and Trinity terms)

Course Details

See details of all courses and timetables.

Registration

Attendance on the Introduction and Core courses requires registration*. There is a course fee** of £450 for all University of Oxford students/postdocs/staff, and a higher fee for external registrants. The number of people we can accommodate is limited, therefore please register as soon as possible.

* Additional Modules do not require registration, but priority will be given to those signed up for the full course.

** The registration fee funds course costs (administration, tutoring/marking and resources). This fee is less than one hour of 3T scan time, and substantially less than a student place on the 5-day FSL Course. It must be paid either via credit card or by supplying an internal grant code.

Target Audience

The course covers basic to advanced level material relating primarily to methods for neuroscience research using MRI. It is aimed at students and postdocs from a wide range of backgrounds, including biological, clinical and physical sciences, especially:

First-Year FMRIB Students

The course is compulsory for all first-year students at FMRIB, who are expected to attend the Core courses and complete the assessments (exams, practicals and project). FMRIB students who feel they have received equivalent training elsewhere can discuss opting out of lectures and practicals with the appropriate Course Organiser or with the Course Director.

Other Attendees

All Oxford students, postdocs and staff are welcome to register for the core course (space permitting). Additional Modules are free and do not require registration. These modules are expected be useful to a broad audience (including second and third year students) who have gained some practical experience in neuroimaging. Note that material on these modules changes from year to year, and this year’s course has substantial new content.

Attendees with Prior Training and Experience

An online-only registration option is available for Oxford students, postdocs and staff who have experience running and analysing their own experiments but would like access to course material to refresh their knowledge.

Online-only registration costs £50 and includes access to all online course materials including podcasts, practical instructions and practical data on a USB drive. However, attendance to tutorial and practical sessions in introduction week and for core courses is NOT included in this registration.

Attendance to additional modules is available since these do not require registration (although registered students will have priority).

Permission is required to register for the online-only course - if you are interested in this option please contact us at graduate_admin@fmrib.ox.ac.uk with details regarding your experience and situation.

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