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Congratulations to Heidi Johansen-Berg, one of 11 University of Oxford biomedical and health scientists that the Academy of Medical Sciences has elected to its fellowship.

Election to Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences is only granted to those who have achieved at the highest level in medical research. We are very fortunate to have Heidi as a colleague and a leader in NDCN. Many congratulations from everyone in the Department.
- Professor Kevin Talbot, Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

All were selected for their exceptional contributions to the advancement of medical science through innovative research discoveries and translating scientific developments into benefits for patients and the wider society.

For her ongoing stewardship of research that focuses on how the brain changes with learning, experience, and damage, Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences is elected a Fellow at the Academy.

She heads up the Plasticity Group, which aims to shed light on how the healthy brain responds to change with implications for understanding and treating disease, including testing new methods for rehabilitation after a stroke.

Professor Dame Anne Johnson PMedSci, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences, said: 'Although it is hard to look beyond the pandemic right now, I want to stress how important it is that the Academy Fellowship represents the widest diversity of biomedical and health sciences. The greatest health advances rely on the findings of many types of research, and on multidisciplinary teams and cross-sector and global collaboration.'

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