Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Congratulations to Heidi Johansen-Berg, one of 11 University of Oxford biomedical and health scientists that the Academy of Medical Sciences has elected to its fellowship.

Election to Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences is only granted to those who have achieved at the highest level in medical research. We are very fortunate to have Heidi as a colleague and a leader in NDCN. Many congratulations from everyone in the Department.
- Professor Kevin Talbot, Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

All were selected for their exceptional contributions to the advancement of medical science through innovative research discoveries and translating scientific developments into benefits for patients and the wider society.

For her ongoing stewardship of research that focuses on how the brain changes with learning, experience, and damage, Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences is elected a Fellow at the Academy.

She heads up the Plasticity Group, which aims to shed light on how the healthy brain responds to change with implications for understanding and treating disease, including testing new methods for rehabilitation after a stroke.

Professor Dame Anne Johnson PMedSci, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences, said: 'Although it is hard to look beyond the pandemic right now, I want to stress how important it is that the Academy Fellowship represents the widest diversity of biomedical and health sciences. The greatest health advances rely on the findings of many types of research, and on multidisciplinary teams and cross-sector and global collaboration.'

Similar stories

Study reveals association between diagnosis of a neuropsychiatric condition and severe outcome from COVID-19 infection, and other severe acute respiratory infections

New research from the University of Oxford has shown an increased risk of severe illness and death from both COVID-19 and other severe respiratory infections, such as influenza and pneumonia, among people with a pre-existing mental health condition.

New study shows clinical symptoms for Alzheimer’s can be predicted in preclinical models

Establishing preclinical models of Alzheimer’s that reflect in-life clinical symptoms of each individual is a critically important goal, yet so far it has not been fully realised. A new collaborative study from the University of Oxford has demonstrated that clinical vulnerability to an abnormally abundant protein in Alzheimer’s brain is in fact reflected in individual patient induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons.

Visit from the Sir Jules Thorn Charitable Trust

Earlier this month, we were delighted to welcome the Director of the Sir Jules Thorn Charitable Trust, Richard Benson, and its Chair of Trustees, Liz Charal.

Oxford receives £122m funding for healthcare research

Health and care research in Oxford is to receive £122 million in government funding over the next five years to improve diagnosis, treatment and care for NHS patients. Our department will play a major role.