Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Congratulations to Heidi Johansen-Berg, one of 11 University of Oxford biomedical and health scientists that the Academy of Medical Sciences has elected to its fellowship.

Election to Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences is only granted to those who have achieved at the highest level in medical research. We are very fortunate to have Heidi as a colleague and a leader in NDCN. Many congratulations from everyone in the Department.
- Professor Kevin Talbot, Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

All were selected for their exceptional contributions to the advancement of medical science through innovative research discoveries and translating scientific developments into benefits for patients and the wider society.

For her ongoing stewardship of research that focuses on how the brain changes with learning, experience, and damage, Professor Heidi Johansen-Berg of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences is elected a Fellow at the Academy.

She heads up the Plasticity Group, which aims to shed light on how the healthy brain responds to change with implications for understanding and treating disease, including testing new methods for rehabilitation after a stroke.

Professor Dame Anne Johnson PMedSci, President of the Academy of Medical Sciences, said: 'Although it is hard to look beyond the pandemic right now, I want to stress how important it is that the Academy Fellowship represents the widest diversity of biomedical and health sciences. The greatest health advances rely on the findings of many types of research, and on multidisciplinary teams and cross-sector and global collaboration.'

Similar stories

New insights into the effect of exposure to dim light in the evening on the biology of the sleep-wake cycle

A new study has revealed more about how exposure to dim light in the evening affects circadian health. The findings emphasise the need to optimise our artificial light exposure if we are to avoid shifting our biological clocks.

Blood lipoprotein levels linked to future risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Greater understanding of the role of lipoproteins could support screening and efforts to develop treatments.

International study finds insomnia, anxiety and depression very prevalent during first phase of COVID-19 pandemic

Researchers are recommending public health interventions to reduce the long-term adverse outcomes associated with chronic insomnia and mental health problems.

Alexander Davies wins top UKRI Future Leaders Fellowship

Alex is one of eight Oxford University academics who have been awarded significant financial funding from the UKRI Future Leaders Fellowships Scheme

New study on link between autoimmunity and pain

Patients with autoantibodies which target neuronal proteins can have pain as an under-recognised clinical manifestation.