Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Researchers in our Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute are working with Havant & South Downs College on a teenage sleep study.

Having confirmed the new 10.00am start-time for A Level courses, Havant & South Downs College will be looking into the effects of teenage sleep patterns on students in comparison to the traditional 9.00am start time.

 

“We are very excited to work with Havant & South Downs College in a teenage sleep study that is the first of its kind in the country. We are looking forward to working closely with the Biology and Psychology departments within the College to track sleep diary data from a group of students, both this academic year with the 9.00am start and next year once the 10.00am start is brought in.”
- Dr Rachel Sharman, Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford

The Teensleep Project was funded by the Education Endowment Foundation and the Wellcome Trust, in order to evaluate the benefits occurring in students’ academic attainment through school-based intervention. Academic research shows that teenagers experience changes to their circadian rhythms – this means that not only do they need more sleep, they also naturally wake up and go to sleep later.

Director of Curriculum for A Levels, Sylvia Wear, said: 'We have implemented the new start time to ensure that our students stay engaged and enthusiastic about learning at College. As an A Level Centre of Excellence, our role is to equip our learners with the necessary skills for university learning, for example by lengthening our lessons and holding more classes in the lecture theatre. It is also to provide connections with the top universities and encourage our learners to partake in research projects such as this one, which is why the Teensleep Project is such a good fit'.

A-Level students Jake Reeve and Sam Brown are helping to collect the data for the new sleep study.

Sam, who studies Maths, Chemistry and Biology and has an offer from the University of Cambridge to study Medicine next year, said: 'My Biology lecturer told me about a sleep study and asked me if I wanted to be involved, and of course I said yes. We have great support from the College to be involved in this while keeping up with our own revision and I think it is worth putting the time in because it’s a great opportunity.'

Jake, who studies Maths, Psychology and Biology and has an offer from the University of Oxford to study Experimental Psychology, said: 'Sleep affects a lot of people and I think there are many problems especially with teenage sleep patterns, so I am keen to be involved in finding any way to help with that.'

 

Similar stories

New genetic diagnosis technology for eye disease receives major funding award

Eye2Gene explores the use of AI to determine which genetic condition is causing a patient’s inherited retinal disease, by examining eye scans.

Royal Commission Industrial Fellowship for Andrei-Claudiu Roibu with F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd

Mapping brain network activity from structural connectivity using deep learning

Researchers awarded Wellcome Innovator Grant to investigate role of brainstem nucleus in human consciousness

Researchers at Oxford University have received a prestigious Wellcome Innovator Grant for investigating the role of the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) – a brainstem nucleus – in human consciousness.

How our dreams changed during the COVID-19 pandemic

This study explored associations between COVID-19 and dream recall frequency, and related social, health, and mental health factors.

New insights into the effect of exposure to dim light in the evening on the biology of the sleep-wake cycle

A new study has revealed more about how exposure to dim light in the evening affects circadian health. The findings emphasise the need to optimise our artificial light exposure if we are to avoid shifting our biological clocks.

Blood lipoprotein levels linked to future risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Greater understanding of the role of lipoproteins could support screening and efforts to develop treatments.