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The new centre is a multi-disciplinary neuroimaging research facility which encompasses the Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain (FMRIB), Oxford Centre for Human Brain Activity (OHBA, Department of Psychiatry) and imaging facilities within the Department of Experimental Psychology.

The Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging (WIN) focuses on the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for neuroscience research, along with related technologies such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, MEG and EEG.

WIN aims to bridge the gap between laboratory neuroscience and human health, by exploiting the capacity of neuroimaging to provide measurements that are sensitive to cellular phenomena and that can also be acquired in living humans.

This is achieved by focusing on five themes: Cross-Species Neuroimaging, Cross-Scale Relationships, Population Data Mining, Clinical Markers and Open Neuroimaging.

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