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This intensive four-day course covers both the theory and practice of functional and structural brain image analysis, combining detailed lectures interleaved with hands-on practical sessions using the FSL software.

The 2015 FSL Course is open for registration.  

The course will be held 8-12 June 2015, at the Marriott Resort Waikiki Beach, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. This is the week before the OHBM conference in Honolulu.

Both new and existing users of FSL are welcome on the course as it aims to cover both basic and advanced features of FSL. 

Numbers of attendees are strictly limited and are available on a first-come-first-served basis.

Please note that the FSL Course is totally separate from the Exploring the Human Connectome course, although both will be run in the same venue on the same days. The two courses are independent and self-contained, and it will not be logistically possible for attendees to attend sessions from both courses.

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