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Bertil Damato will oversee the provision of clinical care to patients with an ocular tumour and develop a research group to focus on ocular melanoma and other eye tumours.

Bertil Damato

Bertil Damato has extensive experience in the ocular oncology field, both in the UK and the US. His achievements include several enhancements in the treatment for ocular melanoma and in survival prognostication by multivariate analysis of genetic aberrations and as well as anatomic and histological predictors. He has also conducted research on quality of life after treatment of intraocular melanoma and has been heavily involved in education aimed at improving the detection and diagnosis of patients with an ocular tumour.

One of the priorities of the Oxford Ocular Oncology Research Group is to devise and evaluate novel methods for educating optometrists and general ophthalmologists on ocular tumour diagnosis, also exploring any opportunities for harnessing advances in artificial intelligence.  

 

 

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