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Our researchers find that activity in a brain area known as the dorsal posterior insula is directly related to the intensity of pain.

The team used a new brain imaging technique to look at people experiencing pain over many hours. The results, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, show that activity in only one brain area, the dorsal posterior insula, reflected the participants' ratings of how much the pain hurt.

Read more on the University of Oxford website...

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