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On 27 July, 16 girls aged between 11-14 joined the SHElock team from our Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging.

None © Frederik Lange

Expertly led by Amy Howard, the team facilitated three sleuthing workshops at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. 

To understand brain connectivity, our young scientists made pipe-cleaner neurons and did diffusion experiments with water and ink.

In the photography studio they found out how MRI scanners take pictures of the brain by learning about the art and science of photography.

Finally, to make it out of our escape room, the girls performed many a botched surgery on kinetic sand brains (and learned how to create an fMRI experiment in the process).

They also had lots of opportunity to ask anyone in the SHElock team questions about the brain, big magnets and life in science.

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