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People born without one hand, who are still able to use both limbs well in otherwise two-handed tasks, are likely to show brain activity which resembles that of people with two hands.

Study volunteer with one hand in brain scanner © OUH NHS Trust
Study volunteer with one hand in brain scanner
The brain doesn't care if you are born with only one hand. The brain is not fussy about whether there is a hand at the end of the arm, a prosthetic or a 'stump' – so long as it is used in a similar way.
- Tamar Makin

Dr Tamar Makin from the Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB) is lead author of this study.

The team's results might indicate ways in which new amputees may be able to regain near-normal function, through therapy which potentially takes advantage of the brain resources normally used by the missing hand.

Read more on the University website...

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