Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

A team of Oxford scientists have written the first three books in a new series of Oxford Neuroimaging Primers, published by Oxford University Press and edited by Mark Jenkinson and Michael Chappell.

Janine Bijsterbosch, Mark Jenkinson and Mark Chappell at FMRIB

These jargon-free accessible textbooks are intended for people who are new to the field of neuroimaging, whether they are undergraduate or graduate students or more senior academics from other fields. 

The first three titles are:

  • Introduction to Neuroimaging Analysis (Mark Jenkinson and Michael Chappell)
  • Introduction to Perfusion Quantification using Arterial Spin Labelling (Michael Chappell and Thomas Okell)
  • Introduction to Resting State fMRI Functional Connectivity (Janine Bijsterbosch, Stephen Smith and Christian Beckmann)

Find out more and buy copies

Similar stories

Magnetic signatures of the brain characterised in UK Biobank imaging study

A study published this week in Nature Neuroscience demonstrates how studying the magnetic properties of tissue may provide a unique window into brain health and disease.

Oxford researchers part of major UK initiative to understand chronic pain

Oxford pain researchers are playing a major role in a new multi-million pound research programme launched by a consortium of funders, including UKRI, Versus Arthritis, Eli Lilly and the Medical Research Foundation.

Professor Irene Tracey nominated as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford

Professor of Anaesthetic Neuroscience Irene Tracey, former head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, has been nominated as the next Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford.

Little understood brain region linked to how we perceive pain

A new DPAG-led review paper, published in the journal Brain, has shown that a poorly understood region of the brain called the claustrum may play an important role in how we experience pain.

Brain regions related to smell show decline following mild COVID-19

Researchers from the University of Oxford have used data from UK Biobank participants to look at changes to the brain on average 4.5 months after mild SARS-CoV-2 infection.