Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Scientists in our Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit have been working with Oxford Sparks to produce this engaging video about their research.

We can think of singers in a choir as neurons in the brain. Like these singers, neurons have to work together to create harmony, and once they do, the results are magnificent!

When neurons, or nerve cells, in the brain communicate with each other, they generate synchronised electrical activities known as brain waves. But what is the function of these brain waves? Can we 'see' them? What happens if these collective activities go 'out of sync'?

In this video, Demi Brizee, a DPhil (PhD) student in the Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit introduces us to the fascinating world of brain waves, and explains how a better understanding of them could lead to new therapies for neurological conditions.

For more information about Parkinson's Disease, please visit the Parkinson's UK website.

To find out more about the use of animals in medical research, please visit the Understanding Animal Research website.

Similar stories

New Public Engagement Ambassadors 2023

We're delighted to introduce our new cohort of public engagement ambassadors for 2023.

Director of MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit appointed

From 2 January 2023, Professor Peter Magill will lead the Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit (MRC BNDU) at the University of Oxford.

How to use the science of the body clock to improve our sleep and health

Professor Russell Foster has written a new book about circadian neuroscience which is published by Penguin this week. This book review by Jacqueline Pumphrey was first published on the University of Oxford website.

MRC BNDU receives a Wellcome Collaborative Award for Parkinson’s research

We are delighted to announce that the MRC Brain Network Dynamics Unit has received Collaborative Award funding from Wellcome for a substantial multi-year research programme designed to advance the understanding of why dopamine-producing nerve cells are especially vulnerable in Parkinson’s.

New Public Engagement Ambassadors

We're delighted to introduce our new cohort of public engagement ambassadors for 2022.

Mapping uncharted networks in the progression of Parkinson’s

A major new $9 million project funded by the Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s (ASAP) initiative will map the original circuits vulnerable to Parkinson’s on an unprecedented scale. The project is a collaboration between core investigators Stephanie Cragg, Richard Wade-Martins, and Peter Magill at Oxford, Mark Howe at Boston University and Dinos Meletis at the Karolinska Institutet, as well as collaborators Yulong Li at Peking University and Michael Lin at Stanford University.