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The Academy of Medical Sciences has today announced the election of fifty new Fellows, including Professor David Bennett and Professor Peter Brown.

Dave Bennett and Peter Brown
Professor David Bennett (left) and Professor Peter Brown (right)

Professor David Bennett studies the response of the nervous system to injury in order to develop strategies to promote nerve repair and to both prevent and treat neuropathic pain. He uses a multi-disciplinary approach ranging from the molecular understanding of ion channel function to psychophysical and genetic studies in patients. His research programme is improving understanding of the signalling events which lead to neuropathic pain, enhancing means of patient stratification, and identifying new analgesic drug targets which are undergoing clinical trials.

It is a great testament to the world class research environment in NDCN that two of our senior colleagues have been named as new fellows this year. Dave Bennett and Peter Brown are leaders in their respective fields and are also major contributors to running the Department as Heads of Divisions, in shaping our strategy and in developing the careers of young neuroscientists. We are very proud to have them as colleagues and offer them warm congratulations.
- Professor Kevin Talbot, Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences

Dave says: 'I very much look forward to working with the Academy, especially when it comes to supporting the next generation of clinical academics. I would like to extend my thanks to my wonderful group here in Oxford and an extensive network of national and European collaborators who make it possible to study neuropathic pain at scale, from molecular pathogenesis to societal impact.’ 

Professor Peter Brown's work concerns brain activity in people with Parkinson's disease. Over the last two decades he has established that synchronised oscillations amongst nerve cells in the basal ganglia of the brains of patients with Parkinson's are linked to symptoms of stiffness and slowness, and has successfully pioneered therapeutic interventions that leverage this phenomenon.

Peter says: 'I am delighted to be elected and thank current and past members of my research team for their terrific support and hard work.'

Fellowship of the Academy of Medical Sciences is conferred on those who have made exceptional and sustained contributions to medical research. The Academy is working to secure a future in which UK and global health is improved by the best research. It aims to ensure that independent, high quality medical science advice informs the decisions that affect society, and more people have a say in the future of health and research. For more information about the Academy of Medical Sciences and this year’s elected Fellows, please see the Academy of Medical Sciences website.

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