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<jats:p>We can be motivated when reward depends on performance, or merely by the prospect of a guaranteed reward. Performance-dependent (contingent) reward is instrumental, relying on an internal action-outcome model, whereas motivation by guaranteed reward may minimise opportunity cost in reward-rich environments. Competing theories propose that each type of motivation should be dependent on dopaminergic activity. We contrasted these two types of motivation with a rewarded saccade task, in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). When PD patients were ON dopamine, they had greater response vigour (peak saccadic velocity residuals) for <jats:italic>contingent</jats:italic> rewards, whereas when PD patients were OFF medication, they had greater vigour for <jats:italic>guaranteed</jats:italic> rewards. These results support the view that reward expectation and contingency drive distinct motivational processes, and can be dissociated by manipulating dopaminergic activity. We posit that dopamine promotes goal-directed motivation, but dampens reward-driven vigour, contradictory to the prediction that increased tonic dopamine amplifies reward expectation.</jats:p>

Original publication

DOI

10.7554/elife.58321

Type

Journal article

Journal

eLife

Publisher

eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd

Publication Date

01/10/2020

Volume

9