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The capacity to stabilize the content of attention over time varies among individuals, and its impairment is a hallmark of several mental illnesses. Impairments in sustained attention in patients with attention disorders have been associated with increased trial-to-trial variability in reaction time and event-related potential deficits during attention tasks. At present, it is unclear whether the ability to sustain attention and its underlying brain circuitry are transformable through training. Here, we show, with dichotic listening task performance and electroencephalography, that training attention, as cultivated by meditation, can improve the ability to sustain attention. Three months of intensive meditation training reduced variability in attentional processing of target tones, as indicated by both enhanced theta-band phase consistency of oscillatory neural responses over anterior brain areas and reduced reaction time variability. Furthermore, those individuals who showed the greatest increase in neural response consistency showed the largest decrease in behavioral response variability. Notably, we also observed reduced variability in neural processing, in particular in low-frequency bands, regardless of whether the deviant tone was attended or unattended. Focused attention meditation may thus affect both distracter and target processing, perhaps by enhancing entrainment of neuronal oscillations to sensory input rhythms, a mechanism important for controlling the content of attention. These novel findings highlight the mechanisms underlying focused attention meditation and support the notion that mental training can significantly affect attention and brain function.

Original publication

DOI

10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1614-09.2009

Type

Journal article

Journal

J Neurosci

Publication Date

21/10/2009

Volume

29

Pages

13418 - 13427

Keywords

Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Analysis of Variance, Attention, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Auditory Perception, Case-Control Studies, Contingent Negative Variation, Dichotic Listening Tests, Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Female, Humans, Male, Meditation, Middle Aged, Reaction Time, Young Adult