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BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that insomnia may be an important therapeutic target to improve mental health. AIMS: Evaluating changes in symptoms of depression and anxiety after supported digital cognitive behavioural therapy (dCBT) for insomnia delivered via a community-based provider (Self Help Manchester) of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) service. METHOD: Supported dCBT for insomnia was delivered to 98 clients (mean age 44.9 years, SD 15.2, 66% female) of Self Help Manchester. All clients received six support calls from an eTherapy coordinator to support the self-help dCBT. During these calls levels of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9) and anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder, GAD-7) were determined. RESULTS: Depression (M difference-5.7, t(70) = 12.5, p < .001) and anxiety [Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), M difference-4.1, t(70) = 8.0, p < .001] were reduced following supported dCBT for insomnia. This translated into an IAPT recovery rate of 68% for depression and anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dCBT for insomnia alleviates depression and anxiety in clients presenting with mental health complaints in routine healthcare.

Original publication

DOI

10.1017/S1352465816000369

Type

Journal article

Journal

Behav Cogn Psychother

Publication Date

01/2017

Volume

45

Pages

91 - 96

Keywords

Depression, anxiety, cognitive behavioural therapy, computerized, insomnia, internet, online, Adult, Anxiety, Anxiety Disorders, Cognitive Therapy, Depression, Depressive Disorder, Female, Humans, Internet, Male, Middle Aged, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, Therapy, Computer-Assisted, Treatment Outcome