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<jats:p>What mechanisms make an antipsychotic atypical? A common view is that the different therapeutic and side-effect profile of atypical compared to typical antipsychotics is due to their high affinity for specific dopamine and/or 5-HT (serotonin) receptors. Dopamine D<jats:sub>4</jats:sub> and 5-HT<jats:sub>2a</jats:sub> receptors are particularly implicated, though many others have been proposed as well, including dopamine D<jats:sub>1</jats:sub> and D<jats:sub>3</jats:sub>, 5-HT<jats:sub>1a</jats:sub>, 5-HT<jats:sub>2c</jats:sub>, 5-HT<jats:sub>6</jats:sub>, 5-HT<jats:sub>7</jats:sub> and α<jats:sub>2</jats:sub> adrenergic receptors (for review, see Deutch <jats:italic>et al,</jats:italic> 1991; Ashby &amp; Wang, 1996; Kinon &amp; Lieberman, 1996).</jats:p>

Original publication

DOI

10.1192/s0007125000298073

Type

Journal article

Journal

British Journal of Psychiatry

Publisher

Royal College of Psychiatrists

Publication Date

05/1999

Volume

174

Pages

12 - 22