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The British Neuroscience Association (BNA) has awarded Angela Vincent, FRS the 2016 Outstanding Contribution to British Neuroscience Award.

The award, launched in 2000, recognises one individual each year who has made a significant impact in their field of work in neuroscience, neurology or mental health research; and who, in addition to international calibre research, has also influenced the advancement of neuroscience by participation on high-level committees and work groups in the UK and beyond.

Angela Vincent is a world-class neuroimmunologist, who has created a step change in the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune disorders, including myasthenia gravis and encephalitis. She is recognised as one of the pioneers in this area of neuroscience and her active translational research has led to the discovery of new brain and neuromuscular diseases. Her work has paved the way for new and improved therapy in some cases, where none was previously available.

Importantly Angela has been an outstanding role model to other women in the biosciences and has always been extremely supportive of young researchers, doing everything she could to help advance their careers.

The award will be presented at the BNA Christmas Symposium in London on 14 December.

Read more about the impact of Angela's work.

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