Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Hosted by Imperial College London, the LIYSF brings together 300 school students from all almost 60 countries for a series of talks, demonstrations, activities and site visits from all areas of the UK’s leading scientific community. 50 students travelled to Oxford for a day of talks and activities focussed on various aspects of neuroscience hosted by Oxford Neuroscience and the Oxford BRC.

Interactive DBS demonstration in Prof Brown’s lab
Interactive DBS demonstration in Prof Brown’s lab

Dr Nicholas Irving opened proceedings with an introductory talk on neuroscience research at Oxford, before Prof Fergus Gleeson spoke to the group about PET-CT imaging. Four separate sessions then ran through the day:

Dr Charlotte Stagg gave a talk on transcranial magnetic stimulation, demonstrating the technique on one of her group.

Dr Claire Sexton showed how exercise can increase cognitive abilities by asking one of the students to perform a simple memory task before and after use of an exercise bike.

Prof Peter Brown’s group explained the use of DBS in treating Parkinson’s symptoms with an interactive display on how surgeons use characteristic oscillations to home in on targets in the brain.

Prof Peter Jezzard demonstrated the new 7T fMRI machine at the FMRIB centre by placing one of his team in the scanner and asking the students to come up with a paradigm to explore the function of different areas of the brain.

The day finished with Prof Russell Foster talking about chronobiology, sleep and circadian rhythms before the students departed for London. 

Similar stories

Bioelectronic implant offers an intelligent therapy to treat incontinence

The first participants in a clinical trial of a bioelectrical therapy to treat incontinence have received their 'smart' bioelectronic implants.

Direct evidence of reduced NMDA receptors in people with form of encephalitis

NMDAR-antibody encephalitis is an autoimmune brain condition caused by patient’s own antibodies that bind to NMDA (N-Methyl-D-Aspartate) receptors in the synapses between nerve cells.

New study shows clinical symptoms for Alzheimer’s can be predicted in preclinical models

Establishing preclinical models of Alzheimer’s that reflect in-life clinical symptoms of each individual is a critically important goal, yet so far it has not been fully realised. A new collaborative study from the University of Oxford has demonstrated that clinical vulnerability to an abnormally abundant protein in Alzheimer’s brain is in fact reflected in individual patient induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cortical neurons.

New insights gained into how the brain encodes information about the world

Scientists have developed a new way to test the theory that active neurons can change what they signal in the world, rather than keeping a stable correspondence to things (such as a features of an object, or ideas).

Oxford and Quinnipiac researchers discuss integrated clinical care, education, and research in multiple sclerosis

Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital's Mandell Center for Multiple Sclerosis Care and Neuroscience Research welcomed University of Oxford partners in September. Stakeholders from University of Oxford and Quinnipiac University met to discuss ongoing research and future opportunities to develop a Mandell MS Center concept of care in the UK.