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Our exhibit at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition (1-7 July 2019), will bring the topic of ‘Breathing with your Brain’ to life!

Breathing is fundamental to life and we all know what it feels like to be out of breath. For most of us, breathlessness passes, but for many people, feeling breathless is a defining part of their lives

Breathe Oxford is a diverse group of neuroscientists, psychologists and clinicians studying the neuroscience of breathlessness. Their work shows that breathing is about more than just the lungs. In fact, the brain has a powerful influence on our experiences. This explains why some people still feel out of breath, even when they have been provided with medical care.

The group explores how the brain controls our feelings of being out of breath using cutting-edge brain imaging technology. Understanding this control system could lead to revolutionary, personalised treatments for breathlessness. 

Come along to the Royal Society this week: you can face the Steppatron, meet the research team, and discover more about the how the brain controls our feelings of being out of breath.

Find out more

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