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Carpal tunnel release provides an opportunity to study sensory nerve regeneration in humans. Annina Schmid et al. show that cutaneous reinnervation correlates with symptom improvement after surgery. ADCYAP1 (encoding PACAP) expression is associated with sensory reinnervation in vivo and facilitates neuron outgrowth in vitro.

Read the paper published in Brain

 

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