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In recognition of the new links with the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences and the Department of Experimental Psychology, the Oxford Clinical Trials Unit for Mental Illness (OCTUMI) has a new name: the Oxford Cognitive Health and Neuroscience Clinical Trials Unit (OCHNCTU, pronounced oc-n-tü) and a new logo.

The OCHNCTU portfolio will, in future, include trials for neurological conditions and cognitive neuroscience. The CTU offers advice and support in all aspects of the planning, conducting and reporting of clinical trials. Key areas of expertise include statistics, trial management, quality assurance, database provision and data management. Where resources permit, specific services (such as a randomisation program or trial monitoring) can be provided.

 

OCHNCTU projects include both non-commercial efficacy trials designed to reduce the uncertainties associated with current treatments and early phase trials evaluating potential new treatments. The CTU is working closely with the Oxford NHS Trusts to increase research productivity and recruitment into trials and has links with TVCLRN, DeNDRoN, the MHRN and other Oxford University Clinical Trials Units. OCHNCTU is also closely affiliated to the Oxford Cognitive Health Clinical Research Facility which supports the translation of neuroscience discoveries into effective therapies. 

For more information, contact Dr Jennifer Rendell on 01865 226465, email ochnctu@psych.ox.ac.uk

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