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Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital's Mandell Center for Multiple Sclerosis Care and Neuroscience Research welcomed University of Oxford partners in September. Stakeholders from University of Oxford and Quinnipiac University met to discuss ongoing research and future opportunities to develop a Mandell MS Center concept of care in the UK.

Thomas Burke, BPharm, MBA, President, Saint Francis Hospital & Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital
Phil Boiselle, M.D., Dean, Frank H. Netter, M.D. School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University
Kwame Asante, M.D., Medical Director, Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital
Mary Bailey, M.D., Regional Medical Director, Rehabilitation and Multiple Sclerosis, Trinity Health Of New England
Dr. DeLuca
Syed Hussain, M.D., Chief Clinical Officer, Trinity Health Of New England

From left to right: Thomas Burke, BPharm, MBA, President, Saint Francis Hospital & Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital, Phil Boiselle, M.D., Dean, Frank H. Netter, M.D. School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, Kwame Asante, M.D., Medical Director, Mount Sinai Rehabilitation Hospital, Mary Bailey, M.D., Regional Medical Director, Rehabilitation and Multiple Sclerosis, Trinity Health Of New England, Dr DeLuca, Syed Hussain, M.D., Chief Clinical Officer, Trinity Health Of New England

Visitors from Oxford included Gabriele DeLuca, Professor of Clinical Neurology and Experimental Neuropathology. The group, which is looking to spearhead change within the NHS, looked at the comprehensive care model that the Mandell MS Center provides to patients. This comprehensive care model includes fellowship-trained neurologists to fight disease progression along with a customised approach to treatment, rehabilitation therapy, and support services.

'The Oxford-Quinnipiac partnership provides an exceptional opportunity to break down boundaries between clinical neurosciences and rehabilitation to deliver world-leading integrated clinical care, education, and research,' said Dr DeLuca. 'The complementary strengths of our institutions have already inspired medical students and nurtured cutting-edge research. The meeting of clinical leadership is an important step in making the provision of multidisciplinary patient-centred care across our centres a reality. In so doing, we hope to make a palpable difference for the better in people with neurological conditions, together.'

The Mandell MS Center provides focused care and supportive services for MS patients. This includes field-leading innovative MS research in partnership with Oxford and Quinnipiac. Through an exchange programme with both universities, researchers are able to conduct innovative academic studies, where teams learn and implement the newest care models as soon as they are available. Patients have the option to participate in cutting-edge studies in the same place they receive care. The partnerships between providers at the Mandell MS Centers and researchers at Oxford and Quinnipiac lead to early intervention and better quality of care sooner after diagnosis.

The exchange programme involves medical students from Oxford and Quinnipiac's Frank H. Netter, M.D. School of Medicine. Oxford medical students participate in a clinical rotation at Mount Sinai, the primary partner for Quinnipiac's Institute for Rehabilitation Medicine. They also spend time at the Netter School, joining Quinnipiac students in learning opportunities that focus on the foundations of neurologic care with the view of bringing this experiential knowledge to the UK to enhance clinical care. Quinnipiac medical students participate in a six-week programme that includes an intensive seminar series at Oxford and four weeks of clinical neurology at the John Radcliffe Hospital.

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