Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

In September 2015 we welcomed 60 members of the public to the John Radcliffe Hospital as part of Oxford Open Doors. The visitors saw how the pioneering work of two physicians working in Oxford during the seventeenth century revolutionised our understanding of how blood flows to and around the brain.

We were impressed by the working being done and by the clarity with which the researchers explained their topics. We also appreciated the friendly welcome. - Visitor

 Staff from the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, and the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences explained how the discoveries of Thomas Willis and William Harvey have shaped our innovative research and treatment for a range of vascular disorders. 

The researchers provided demonstrations of blood flow and heart monitoring techniques and demystified clinical procedures for subarachnoid haemorrhage, as well as giving a tour of the Acute Vascular Imaging Centre

Similar stories

Insights into the molecular pathways of progressive multiple sclerosis

Text by Ian Fyfe for 'Nature Reviews Neurology'

Discovery of gene involved in chronic pain creates new treatment target

Our researchers have discovered a gene that regulates pain sensitisation by amplifying pain signals within the spinal cord. This is helping them to understand an important mechanism underlying chronic pain in humans, and provides a new treatment target.

Lymph nodes reveal more about mechanisms of autoimmunity

Two recent papers show that studying lymph nodes reveals details of the mechanisms of autoimmunity.

Multiple heart-related conditions linked to triple dementia risk, regardless of genetics

Having multiple conditions that affect the heart is linked to a greater risk of dementia than having high genetic risk, according to a large-scale new study.

NDCN research presented at Myasthenia Gravis conference

The 14th Quinquennial Myasthenia Gravis Federation of America International Conference was recently held in Miami with 450 delegates attending in person, including over 100 from industry.